Keynote speaker on global trends, author of 16 Futurist books - Patrick Dixon.

Future of Telcos - phone companies, next-generation telecommunications, winners and losers in global shakeout, mega-mergers, controlling the world's bandwidth and smartphone platforms, e-commerce and mobile payments - keynote speaker

Future of Telcos Keynotes, Smartphones,Omnichannel

Telcos had a massive boost from the COVID pandemic.  I work with many of the world's largest telcos. They all benefitted hugely from instant shift towards virtual work, virtual social life, virtual entertainment and virtual leisure. Huge increase in spending on personal bandwidth, increased use of personal devices. Huge increase in corporate spending on enterprise wide virtual working tools, upgrades of video conferencing equipment, upgrades in bandwidth with increased dependence on video

If we ever realised our total dependence on high bandwidth, it was at the moment that the world plunged into lockdown. Internet access or speed was no longer the issue, rather continuous, uninterrupted high bandwidth to allow high quality video links. However, the telco industry faced fundamental issues before COVID, and these issues remain.

Over 90% of all web traffic is now video in many developed nations - COVID just accelerated a long trend.  It is already the case in the UK that BBC iPlayer, NetFlix and YouTube alone account for more than 60% of the nation’s web traffic. A single 2-hour video is equivalent to a hundred million emails, or days of voice calls. So forget charging for voice or anything else – costs are dwarfed by streaming video. Data on mobiles will increase 1000 fold in the next 5 years, on 50 billion mobile devices connected to 5G, running at 10gps or higher. That means an entire high-definition movie will download in less than 3 seconds.  So telcos will be forced to focus on new kinds of business, for example cloud services for larger companies.

Read more: Future of Telcos - phone companies, next-generation telecommunications, winners and losers in global shakeout, mega-mergers, controlling the world's bandwidth and smartphone platforms, e-commerce and mobile payments - keynote speaker

 

Future of Medical Tourism - $40 billion a year industry, over 11 million people travelling to other nations for lower cost hospital treatments, health care, dentistry or cosmetic surgery. Organ trafficking. Medical tourism will grow to $130bn by 2025.

Health, Coronavirus Speaker Future Pharma Keynotes

One way to reduce health costs for individuals, insurers or government is to move patients abroad for treatment, and we will see a lot more of this.

‘Medical tourism’ is already a $40bn industry, growing 20% a year, with over 11 million people annually travelling to another country for private treatment, and possibly convalescence in a nice hotel.  The market could be worth over $130bn by 2025. 

The savings in all types of medical tourism can be huge: private health care in Brazil is only 25% of the cost in America, India 73%, Mexico 50%, Thailand 65%, Turkey 60%. Within the EU itself there are also major cost differences – for example, dental treatment in Hungary is far cheaper than in Paris.

Read more: Future of Medical Tourism - $40 billion a year industry, over 11 million people travelling to other nations for lower cost hospital treatments, health care, dentistry or cosmetic surgery. Organ trafficking. Medical tourism will grow to $130bn by 2025.

 

Are robots really about to take over the world? Why sales of robots have grown slowly. Future of AI / Artificial intelligence. Impact of robots and automation on jobs / unemployment and economic growth - keynote speaker

Manufacturing, Logistics, Supply Chain Keynotes

Despite all the talk of robots taking over most menial jobs and putting tens of millions out of work, the growth of robots in factories has been slow – up from 92,000 to a mere 387,000 a year from 2000 to 2017. A third of that increase was in 2017. Compare this to growth of smartphones, for instance, and the pace is still snail-like. Sales of such robots are likely to increase by around 10-15% a year – mostly confined to the auto industry, which owns most robots in America. Robots will become cheaper and more intelligent, but smaller models will still cost over $20,000 each in 2020.

Expect rapid growth in military robots – with tens of thousands of drones owned by the Pentagon alone, raising the prospect of swarms of small, semi-autonomous flying robots being thrown into the air above a major battle zone. “Suicide drones” will soon be available on the open market, able to fly 80 miles an hour, to detonate explosives at any target 40 miles away.

Read more: Are robots really about to take over the world? Why sales of robots have grown slowly. Future of AI / Artificial intelligence. Impact of robots and automation on jobs / unemployment and economic growth - keynote speaker

   

Future of Fashion Industry, clothing and textiles - and why Male fashion will continue to change slowly, while female fashion will become more diverse and ethical: wages, factory conditions and environment / sustainability. Keynote speaker

Future of Retail Keynotes: Food, Drink, Malls, Web

The fashion industry has always been about tribes: what kind of person do you want to be? With whom are you identifying by the way you dress?  Expect hundreds more highly influential 16- or 17-year-olds, each with several million social network followers who read their blogs or tweets or watch their videos, to follow suit. That's regardless of how they buy: online or at a traditional store.

The fashion and textiles industries are worth over $1.8 trillion, growing 5% a year, employing 75 million people. At present 50% of global growth in apparel sales is in China, which has overtaken the US as the largest market. But prices globally have been falling in real terms for two decades, and will continue to do so as scale increases.

In the US, the industry employs 4 million people, in 280,000 outlets for clothes and shoes. I met an American cotton manufacturer recently who makes 1,400 pairs of socks every minute. Fashion is worth over $40bn a year to the UK economy, employing over 800,000 people – more than telcos, car manufacturing and publishing combined.

Read more: Future of Fashion Industry, clothing and textiles - and why Male fashion will continue to change slowly, while female fashion will become more diverse and ethical: wages, factory conditions and environment / sustainability. Keynote speaker

 

Future of Genetics Research and impact on Pharma / Biotech - genetic engineering, genetic prophecy, customised medicine, personalised treatments, redesigning life - Biotech Keynote Speaker

BioTech, MedTech, Gene Therapy and Stem Cells

We have entered the Age of the Gene, as I predicted in The Genetic Revolution (1993). Humankind now has the power to redesign the very basis of life itself, and to create a new super-race of people with enhanced DNA. It is impossible to overstate the long term significance of this, which is the basis of transhumanism.

Ability to read your genetic code (genome): It took $3bn and 15 years of work to decode a single genome, a cost which has already fallen to around $1000.  By 2025, it is likely that doctors will be able to read an individual’s genetic code in less than 2 hours for less than $500, enabling us to predict our medical future with far greater accuracy – comparing patterns of genomes, medical records and lifestyle data.

Expect gene readers on devices as small as today’s USB sticks by 2040, taking 30 minutes to decode each strip of genetic code. Gene screening will be free for many people within 20 years, paid for by pharmacies for loyal customers, or by companies wanting to protect employee health, or by insurance companies and governments

Read more: Future of Genetics Research and impact on Pharma / Biotech - genetic engineering, genetic prophecy, customised medicine, personalised treatments, redesigning life - Biotech Keynote Speaker

   

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