Keynote speaker on global trends, author of 16 Futurist books - Patrick Dixon.

The truth about BitCoin Crisis - BitCoin uses as much energy globally as the entire power generation of 180 nations combined. Shocking truth about BitCoin unsustainability - similar problems for all Blockchain technology

Banks, Banking, Mobile Payments, FinTech, BitCoins

A single BitCoin transaction uses as much electricity as your home for a week

Here are some facts about BitCoin that will limit its future:

- BitCoins are made by solving a complex digital puzzle

- BitCoins have no actual value – the price people are willing to pay is based on what people think they may be worth in future

- It takes a lot of computing power to create them – and computers

- It takes 94,000 kw hours at the time of writing to produce a single BitCoin

- Bitcoin “mining” uses more power globally a year than 180 entire nations put together

- That’s more power on this experiment last year than 2 billion of the poorest people used – 1 billion of which have no access to a national grid

- Consumption is already equivalent to 25% of the UK’s entire energy output

- Also equivalent to entire power use by 4.3 million homes across America

- That’s the same as 24 megatons of carbon dioxide or 1.2 million transatlantic flights

- A single BitCoin transaction, logged in a BlockChain, burns up as much energy as your home for a week – so forget about using BitCoins as a global day-to-day currency

Read more: The truth about BitCoin Crisis - BitCoin uses as much energy globally as the entire power generation of 180 nations combined. Shocking truth about BitCoin unsustainability - similar problems for all Blockchain technology

 

Future of the Travel Industry - COVID passports, post COVID pandemic, what next? Why the travel industry will be an engine of global economic growth, especially in Asia. Travel industry keynote speaker

Future of Travel Keynotes, Transport, Tourism

Along with manufacturing, retail and banking, the travel industry will be a fundamental engine of future globalisation, despite the huge impact of the COVID pandemic in 2020 and 2021 onwards. The reason is that human beings are genetically programmed to travel as hunter-gatherers, and have an irresistible urge to explore. (Written April 2021)

And as experience showed in 2020, whenever local, national or regional restrictions ease a little, huge numbers start booking trips almost immediately.  This will all be helped by global COVID passports - showing evidence of COVID infection in the past, or vaccination or very recent negative tests. Yes we can expect great debate about COVID passports: on the one hand COVID passports are a practical and common sense solution, allowing people who can prove they have immunity to travel or attend major events etc.  

But on the other hand COVID passports pose ethical issues, by potentially creating an underclass of people who effectively lose human rights to assemble, to experience normal life, deprived of normal social liberties - maybe because of underlying health issues which mean that they cannot be safely vaccinated.

We can expect pent-up demand, as people look to spend more than usual on holidays using saved up budgets during lockdown.

Therefore, whatever happens in the current pandemic, to the global economy, or in other world events, in general terms over the next 30 years we can expect the number of people travelling each day to grow dramatically as wealth increases, and as real costs of transport continue to fall.

Consider this: 85% of humanity lives in emerging markets, and most people in the world are still dreaming of taking their first flight one day.The greatest growth in travel will be within Asia, and in people from Asia visiting outside their own region. We will see a rapid increase in the number and size of regional airports, high-speed rail networks, and new roads.

Read more: Future of the Travel Industry - COVID passports, post COVID pandemic, what next? Why the travel industry will be an engine of global economic growth, especially in Asia. Travel industry keynote speaker

 

Future of the insurance industry - huge growth in emerging markets driven by 85% of the world who have no insurance of any kind. Managing insurance risks with better underwriting. Insurance trends keynote speaker

Future of Insurance Industry / Risk - Keynotes

I have advised many of the world's largest insurers and reinsurance companies on managing risk and identifying key trends.

Insurance is as fundamental to a stable and prosperous society as banking, hospitals and schools.Y et more than 3 billion people have never heard of insurance, do not know how it works, and have no idea how to get hold of it.

Expect rapid growth, therefore, of basic insurance in emerging markets, targeted mainly at the emerging middle class.

Health insurance will lead the way, after insurance types that people are forced by law to buy, such as motor insurance. Expect a boost in many nations in sales of life or health products, encouraged by tax rebates, especially where they are structured to contain an element of saving.

Many who are unbanked today will gain their first insurance cover using a smartphone, or through micro-loans groups and savings associations.

Read more: Future of the insurance industry - huge growth in emerging markets driven by 85% of the world who have no insurance of any kind. Managing insurance risks with better underwriting. Insurance trends keynote speaker

   

Future of Law Firms, Accountancy, Auditing and Global Consulting Companies, Professional Service Firms - keynote speaker

Law Firms, Accountancy, Professional Services

There are very few global consulting and accounting firms, and this is already causing big problems for regulators, unhappy when the same companies audit the same accounts for years. We should be worried when auditors are from the same organisation as consultants, when huge companies find members of their teams on both sides of complex deals. It is hardly surprising that so many audits of multinationals have turned out to be so misleading to investors.

Arthur Andersen disappeared almost overnight as a result of the Enron scandal, and it will only take one more such event to create a crisis, because only three global firms would remain. Expect further regulations about companies needing to change their auditors every few years, and more restrictions on conflicts of interest.

As I predicted, Auditors are becoming more strictly audited themselves regarding their own performance.  Auditors will increasingly be held legally responsible when banks or insurers or other types of company fail spectacularly, soon after a clean audit. It is outrageous that global auditors have been able to walk away without penalty, from large companies that collapse, only days or weeks after being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to vet them for accounting irregularities and risks.

Read more: Future of Law Firms, Accountancy, Auditing and Global Consulting Companies, Professional Service Firms - keynote speaker

 

Reactions against Virtual Work and Relationships - Life beyond Covid - what it means for retail, music, leisure and the workplace, for dating, families and our wider world. Why there will always be premium for "breathing the same air"

Future Relationships, Family, Marriage, Divorce

Personal lives are measured in minutes, major events in seconds. And COVID has forced our world to become even more virtual. Our world is obsessed with instant information. 

Digital addiction was already one of the commonest causes of anxiety, depression and complete mental breakdown, particularly among young people, before COVID, even more so during lockdown.

During the height of the COVID crisis, hundreds of millions have been forced to spend far more time online or on video calls than they would otherwise have chosen, and much of that will revert.

Before the pandemic began, the average 15-25 year old in the UK already spent an average of 4 hours a day on a mobile, checking for messages every 9 minutes, with time online directly correlated with risk of mental health issues.

But that is nothing compared to the Philippines, where a 2019 survey reported people saying that they spent an average of 10 hours online.

Read more: Reactions against Virtual Work and Relationships - Life beyond Covid - what it means for retail, music, leisure and the workplace, for dating, families and our wider world. Why there will always be premium for "breathing the same air"

   

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